Howard University Graduate School
Office of Educational Affairs
Graduate Programs
Nutritional Sciences

The Graduate School offers the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees within the Department of Nutritional Sciences.

The Master of Science is offered in Nutrition. The Doctor of Philosophy is offered in Nutrition, with options in Experimental Nutrition, and Community Nutrition.

General Admission Requirements

A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is preferred and a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in major course work is required. Each graduate department may have additional "special admission requirements" which are noted on this page.

  • Completed on-line application and signature page or
  • Download the paper application (HTML) | (Acrobat)
  • The non-refundable $45 application fee (Waivers accepted for FAMU Feeder Program and McNair Scholars)
  • Official transcripts must be submitted directly from the Registrar’s Office from ALL colleges and universities attended
  • GRE Scores (Only official score reports are accepted within 5 years of the test date) www.gre.org
  • Statement of Academic and Research Interest
  • Autobiographical Sketch (Personal biography)
  • Resume
  • Three letters of recommendation Word

For International Applicants

In addition to the requirements listed above you must meet the following:

  • Official transcripts, certificates and/or mark/grade sheets must be sent directly from the college or university to the Office of Graduate Recruitment and Admissions, and must show proof of degree(s) earned, courses taken and marks/grades received. Also, ALL transcripts must be evaluated by World Education Services (www.wes.org) or AACRAO (www.aacrao.org) and be forwarded to Graduate Recruitment and Admissions.
  • TOEFL Scores (Minimum computer-based score of 213 is required and only official score reports are accepted within 2 years of the test date) www.toelf.org
Special Admission Requirements

Master of Science

A student who does not meet the above requirement may be admitted as a provisional degree student.

Two categories of students may be admitted provisionally into the master's programs of the Graduate School:

  1. those who have the minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) and who would otherwise qualify for regular degree admission status except for deficiencies in course preparation and
  2. those who have less than the minimum 3.0 cumulative average but who on other grounds are judged by the department as capable of completing a graduate program. A student having only a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution who is admitted into the master's programs in the latter category must have a GPA of 2.7; students admitted from graduate programs must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in graduate courses. All students admitted provisionally may take a minimum of nine credit hours per semester and are allowed a maximum of one year to qualify as a regular degree student. However, students in this category who were admitted with less than a 3.0 GPA must complete 12 graduate credits during the academic year.

Students seeking the Master of Science in Nutrition must show evidence of successful completion of the following undergraduate courses: one year of general chemistry*, one year of organic chemistry*, one semester of biochemistry, and two semesters of nutrition. These courses are considered deficiencies for students who have not previously enrolled in them.

Doctor of Philosophy

Students desiring to enter the Ph.D. program in nutrition must: hold a master's degree and show evidence of having successfully completed at least one year of general chemistry*,  lecture and lab, one year of organic chemistry*, two semesters of nutrition, one semester of zoology or physiology, and one semester of biochemistry. In addition, students who pursue the option in experimental nutrition must have completed one semester of quantitative analysis.

 

Special Degree Requirements

All students seeking a master's degree in Nutrition must complete at least 32 semester credits and a thesis. A maximum of 6 credits may be taken from courses which may be taken by advanced undergraduate and graduate students. The required core courses are 270-301, and 270-302; and Statistics (Psychology 218-207, Biology 280-430 or Education 253-205).

All students pursuing the M.S. degree are required to complete a qualifying examination before they may have a thesis research proposal approved or be admitted to candidacy. The qualifying examination is written and consists of a subject-matter component. A graduate student who fails the qualifying examination on the first attempt may again attempt to pass the failed component(s) when offered during any subsequent semester. A third attempt will not be allowed. A passing grade for the qualifying examination must be at least 80%.

Master of Science in Nutrition

Students must take a minimum of 32 semester credits of graduate level courses, including: Nutritional Sciences 270-301, 270-302, and 270-310; 10 semester credits from courses at the 300 level in Nutritional Sciences; statistics; and the remainder of credits from graduate 200- or 300- level courses in nutrition and food or related graduate disciplines, such as education, communications, biochemistry, statistics, psychology, sociology, zoology, or chemistry.

Doctor of Philosophy in Nutrition

Two options are offered in the Ph.D. program in Nutrition: experimental nutrition, and community nutrition. Specific related courses at the graduate level are required to support each option. These courses should be taken early in the Ph.D. program. A departmental committee will determine the individual requirements for matriculation in the program, which are in addition to general graduate requirements.

Students desiring to continue in the Ph.D. program in nutrition must: Take a preliminary examination for evaluation of his or her background in nutrition, reasoning, and mathematics during the first year of matriculation in the Ph.D. program. Take a qualifying examination covering course work prior to admission to candidacy and dissertation research. Take a final oral examination based primarily on the dissertation research and related areas of study.

Courses at the 300 level are open to students who meet the prerequisite requirements for these courses but who are not necessarily enrolled at that time in the Ph.D. program in nutrition.

Following are the degree options, along with their course requirements:

Experimental Nutrition : Nutritional Sciences 270-310 (to be taken a minimum of 4 semesters), 270-311, 270-312, 270-313, 270-314, 270-315, and 270-319 and 1 to 12 credits of 270-401 and 270-402. Optional courses strongly recommended include Nutritional Sciences 270-284 and 270-316. Required supportive courses are Physiology 217-210, Biochemistry 205-251 and 205-252, Chemistry 205-259, and 6 credits of graduate statistics.

Community Nutrition : Nutritional Sciences 270-284, 270-310 (to be taken a minimum of 4 semesters), 270-311, 270-312, 270-313, 270-314, 270-315, 270-316, 270-317, and 270-318 and 1 to 12 credits of 270-401 and 270-402. Required supportive courses include a minimum of 18 credits of graduate courses in the sciences, humanities or social sciences, with approval of the adviser, including 6 credits in graduate statistics and 3 credits of biochemistry.

Nutrition and Human Development : Nutritional Sciences courses may be taken by advanced undergraduate and graduate students. The required core courses are 270-301, and 270-302; and Statistics (Psychology 218-207, Biology 280-430 or Education 253-206).

All students pursuing the M.S. degree are required to complete a qualifying examination before they may have a thesis research proposal approved or be admitted to candidacy. The qualifying examination is written and consists of a subject-matter component. A graduate student who fails the qualifying examination on the first attempt may again attempt to pass the failed component(s) when offered during any subsequent semester. A third attempt will not be allowed. A passing grade for the qualifying examination must be at least 80 percent.

Master of Science in Nutrition 

Students must take a minimum of 32 semester credits of graduate level courses, including: Nutritional Sciences 270-301, 270-302, and 270-310; 10 semester credits from 270-208, 270-284, 270-310 ( to be taken a minimum of 4 semesters), 270-011, 270-312, 270-313, 270-314, 270-315, 270-316, and one to 12 credits of 270-401, and 270-402. In addition, a minimum of 18 credits of graduate courses in the sciences, humanities or social sciences, with approval of the adviser, including 6 credits in graduate statistics, biochemistry, and Human Development 256-221.

*lecture and lab

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